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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
sources that the nsa can't determine the full extent what he took. a new report out in "wall street journal" that points to new details about the nsa surveillance reach. the report says the nsa can monitor 75% of all u.s. internet traffic. much more than had been publicly disclosed. i want to bring in alex burns and lauren fox. good morning. >> good morning. >> so, alex, is this like a spigot? things keep dripping out over time? i mean, does it mean these stores get less attention and less gets done because people sort of feel like it's the sky is falling? or is there some movement building around this when it comes to more transparency? >> chris, i think we are going to see, going into certainly 2014 and then as you see politicians, i think you'll see a intensifying discussion about this. every couple of days there is some new story what exactly the nsa is up to or some sort of personality driven drama like we have seen with eric snowden and glenn greenwald the last couple of days and keeps washington focused on this and prompt folks in the senate and house to weigh in on exactly h
to that new "the washington post" report concerning the nsa. the report says the nsa broke privacy rules or overstep its legal authority thousands of time each year since 2008. >>> it's not a problem. it worked. if you have 99.9% compliance and so few reporting errors this came from an internal report which then becomes part of an overall ig report. i'm on the intelligence committee. i'm satisfied we're told. >> the problem and there is a real problem with the system. it's a black box, the fisa court is a secret tribunal issuing secret opinions making secret law and a lot of it completely unavailable to members even of the foreign intelligence committee. >> those documents published by the "the washington post" were leaked by edward snowden. >>> this weekend has been a wash out in parts of the south. heavy rains flooded several streets in north carolina and more rain is expected through the weekend. will it end? when is the question. we have more on that. >> we're still keeping an eye on the rain up and down the east coast. it's streaming in off the gulf of mexico and the southeast will
-- >> the philosophical objection to all the nsa programs is that you don't want the government. everyone knows that amazon has all of your information. so does, you know, your online grocer who takes your food order every week. this is about the federal government having too much information and too much control over their lives. >> like they don't have it already. >> as a stout nra member, i'm upset to know they may know what i'm doing, how i'm doing, what i'm doing with i many guns. >> where you keep them in your east hampton cottage. >> east hampton, it's ammo city out there. >> yes, i just heard from someone, a concerned viewer that when we say guns, we're not talking about your biceps. >> oh, there you go. >> okay. talking of surveillance. government programs. >> we want to see them today. you have three hours for you to reveal your guns. >> no, no, no. >> this is marketing. marketing is for the consumer's needs. obviously there's a consumer need out there to see the biceps. so we will, as marketers, as journalists. yes, that will happen at 8:00. >> it won't. i promise you, it really won'
are like thank you for bringing summer back. >> i'm glad it's making a comeback. >>> does the nsa really know how much of our information has been compromised? plus an incredible rescue by a firefighter all caught on camera. peoi go to angie's listt for all kinds of reasons. to gauge whether or not the projects will be done in a timely fashion and within budget. angie's list members can tell you which provider is the best in town. you'll find reviews on everything from home repair to healthcare. now that we're expecting, i like the fact i can go onto angie's list and look for pediatricians. the service providers that i've found on angie's list actually have blown me away. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. otherworldly things. but there are some things i've never seen before. this ge jet engine can understand 5,000 data samples per second. which is good for business. because planes use less fuel, spend less time on the ground and more time in the air. suddenly, faraway places don't seem so...far away. ♪ >>> the white
to provide temporary asylum to the nsa leaker, edward snowden, or even russia's high-profile arrest recently of a u.s. diplomat who they have accused of being a cia spy and who they perp walked to a great effect. it's not even just russia's decision to ban american couples from adopting russian children. it's also russia's recent spate of anti-gay legislation which has drawn lots of criticism from the west, and some calls that the world should boycott the upcoming winter olympics that are due to be held in russia next year. >> i know that one question that's been raised is how do we approach the olympics? i want to just make very clear right now i do not think it's appropriate to boycott the olympics. we've got a bunch of americans out there who are training hard, who are doing everything they can to succeed. nobody's more offended than me by some of the anti-gay and lesbian legislation you've been seeing in russia, but as i said just this week, i've spoken out against that not just with respect to russia, but a number of other countries where we continue to do work with them but have a stro
germany. >> working with top-level sources like that former nsa employee, uncovering government secrets, shooting and producing her films all over the world, laura poitress, the documentarian, she has been busy. she's been doing traveling for her work, for her films, she found she gets stopped a lot at the airport and not anything like what you might get stopped for at the airport for. she's been stopped dozens and dozens of times at the airport. for interrogations that sometimes last for hours. miss poitress started taking extraordinary precautions with her data using encrypted e-mail, working on computers that were not connected to the internet. stashing her notes in safe deposit boxes. she kept on, though, getting stopped at the airport. starting in 2006, she was detained and questioned like that more than 40 times. in april of last year, salon.com wrote about what had been happening to laura poitress as she tried to travel, then finally, finally after that public attention, and that article from salon.com, the airport interrogations of laura poitras stopped. she found, okay, she can
because of edward snowden an the nsa leaks. basically information on what we're doing to try to stop the next terrorist attack against americans. this is pretty explosive stuff. >> yeah. i mean this is increasing, the third rail of american politics, "the washington post" obtained new details about what it describes as a black budget for u.s. spy agencies. here are some of the revelations. the u.s. has spent more than half a trillion dollars on national intelligence programs following the 9/11 attacks. that number includes all 16 spy agencies. for the 2013 fiscal year alone, $52 billion was allocated for the program with the cry gettiag most at $14.7 billion as requested. according to the "washington post" despite the massive dollars spent on the programs, the agencies repain unable to provide critical information to the president on a range of national security. threats. also raising eyebrows from the report the u.s. intelligence lumps israel in with hostile foes like iran, cuba, china and russia as a key target for u.s. counter intelligence efforts. it's amazing how much money sinc
the president close. is it nsa stuff, what is it? it has become more common since the late 1990s to talk about this. obviously because the country did it, went through it in '98 with president clinton. it's not, you know, impeachment is always a political tool. there's always some political element to it, obviously, because there is no definition of high crimes and misdemeanors. what is that? every generation, every congress, whoever wants to do it can redefine it. it's a kind of crazy armageddon. and i think that it's a sign of a certain derangement as we've talked about a lot on the part of any opponent of an incumbent president to go to this because you're trying to delegitimize the president who holds the office. it happened when conservatives did it with bush. it happened with conservatives and clinton that was strong push to delegitimize the president and a lot of people did not believe deserved to be president and that's what this talk is about now. it's the deepest, most significant kind of attack that you could make on a president and it will be interesting to see if it's coburn just
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)